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Current Issue
August 2014

Jennifer Walden



audio.jeney@gmail.com
Authored Articles
Audio For Games
Published: March 6, 2014

Building an interesting combat soundtrack is tricky because typically the gameplay is repetitious. There’s a lot of bang-bang-bang happening (or clang-clang-clang, depending on the era of the storyline). So how do you break the monotony? Offering players a variety of weapons is a good start, but that’s only scratching the surface. No matter the size of the arsenal, sounds need to change. Adjusting the EQ to account for perspective or adding reverb in spacious environments are effective changes that add variety and keep a game from sounding too gamey. Improving the game’s dynamic range also keeps the soundtrack from becoming stagnant, and it helps players from becoming sonically fatigued. These game audio pros share their combat game experiences, and how they build compelling combat soundtracks.
Audio: Mixing Web Series
Published: July 8, 2013

There are so many variables in mixing a Web series. It’s not an easy job. There are no set guidelines for levels. There are no set guidelines for encoding the audio — something the mixer has no control over. You spend tons of time getting a mix perfect and then it gets squashed during the encoding process. Frustrating!
Audio for TV Series
Published: April 18, 2013

We are a creative bunch, and the reality of our work is tight deadlines. The trick is to keep a balance between working quickly but carefully without sacrificing creativity. So how do we do that? 
Audio For Independent Films
Published: January 4, 2013

It can be hard to identify an indie film these days. Budgets can rival that of blockbuster films. Major indie films can have star-studded casts. It’s not easy to glean from a preview if a film is truly an independent film or not. The difference lies in the creative chain of command, and who has the final say over what makes the cut.
AUDIO SWOT: Sounds Good
Published: January 3, 2013

There have been some exciting changes in the audio post industry. In 2012, we had the introduction of 3D audio systems for feature films, such as Dolby’s Atmos on Brave and Barco’s Auro-3D on Red Tails. We’ve seen several new devices able to run applications and mobile games. And in December, the implementation of the CALM Act for TV spec.
The Sound of 'Les Miserables'
Published: December 14, 2012

In Post’s November 2012 article Mic’d Up, I talked with production sound editor Simon Hayes about the recording process for the musical Les Miserables, which is coming to theaters December 25. While we don’t cover the production side of things, the film took a very unusual approach to the soundtrack. The whole idea from the beginning of the project was to allow the actors to perform at their own pacing and then use those performances right through to the finish of the film.
Film Sound: 'Pitch Perfect'
Published: September 28, 2012

Coming to theaters October 5th is the Universal Studios film, Pitch Perfect, which features the music of collegiate a cappella singing groups. Pitch Perfect is a musical comedy about an all-girl singing group, The Bellas, and their rise to awesomeness after they change their approach to song-choice and arrangement. Their ultimate goal is to show up a rival male a cappella group in a championship competition.  
Audio for New Media
Published: July 9, 2012

“It doesn’t take a Super Bowl-sized budget to reach a Super Bowl-sized audience,” says Jason Berger of Kids At Play, a one-stop production company that specializes in digital video production. With a small, skilled crew it’s possible to quickly produce creative digital content, like Webisodes or mobile games, and easily disseminate it to a worldwide audience faster than any other medium. 
Game Audio: What it takes
Published: March 20, 2012

Game audio requires the most experience of any industry, says Composer/Sound Designer Gregory Hainer. He has worked on a laundry list of top game titles such as: Guild Wars 2, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim, Batman: Arkham Asylum, Justice League Heroes, and many more. Hainer owns Scorpio Sound (www.scorpiosound.com) in Hollywood, California. 
Unsung Audio Gear
Published: February 23, 2012

Luke Skywalker had C-3PO. B.B. King had his guitar, Lucille. Elvis had the Shure 55S. Dr. Edward Morbius had Robby the Robot. Throughout history, and fiction, technology has lent itself to being a faithful sidekick. It’s helpful, handy, and hard working.
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